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LESSON PLAN FORMAT

The Lesson Plan outline is similar for all the topics. Individual lesson plans are never finished. They will always be a work in progress. Just like in teaching where change is the only thing that stays constant, all lesson plans will be modified and added to when appropriate.

 

The topic is listed first (bullying, friends)

The title of the book is listed in bold.

The author’s name is in italics.

The lesson plan number is on the top right.

Below the lesson plan number is the date of the last change to the page.

The Circle Discussion does two things. First, it is a recall session where we go over information that has been presented in prior lessons. Second, it is a time to talk about the concept that we will be investigating today.

The Pre Reading Discussion asks some specific questions.

  1. What is the title of this book?

  2. What do you think this story is going to be about?

Now give a description of the story.

Just before you read the story set up the writing lesson by saying “When you are listening to this story I want you to think about ______.” Tell them they will be making a (picture, sentence, or book) about _____ when the story is finished.

Read the story.

The Pre Writing Discussion lets the children know what they are going to write about, if they are going to make a picture, sentence, or a book, and gives them time to think about what they will be writing by listening to their classmates talk about the concept. Tell them the concept from the story they are going to write about and if they are going to make a picture, sentence, or book. Ask each child what their picture, sentence, or book is going to be about.

Picture Making is the first and easiest option. The child simply draws a picture of the concept that was discussed and talked about in the story. Then they can share their thoughts and picture.

Sentence Making is the next option. This is broken down into five levels of ability.

Level 1. Student colors a handout of a picture related to the story just read. The teacher writes down what the child dictates. For Example: If you just read “The Ant Bully” the handout is a line drawing of an ant that the student can color in.

Level 2. Student colors a picture related to the story just read. The teacher writes down what the child dictates.

Level 3. Student writes a one word sentence (Ant). Then draws a picture related to the story just read. Student reads the word and tells how the picture is related to the story.

Level 4. Student writes a simple sentence (The ant. The bully. My ant. A bully.). Then draws a picture related to the story just read. Student reads the sentence and tells how the picture is related to the story.

Level 5. Student writes a longer sentence or more than one sentence (The ant and the bully. The ant is a bully.). Then draws a picture related to the story just read. Student reads the sentence(s) and tells how the picture is related to the story.

My Book Making process requires two 8 and 1/2 by 11 sheets of unlined paper folded in half and stapled together forming a seam like a book binding. I demonstrate making the blank books and after about a week most can make their own. I usually have my students write the words first then go back and draw the pictures. At the beginning of the year we start with just a title and the child’s name on the cover and usually our first few attempts are wordless books with just four pictures that tell the child’s story. In another example: Lesson bu15g “The Bully From The Black Lagoon” asks the question: What are some things a bully might do at school? The Book Making lesson suggests that the students write only one word on each page. The four pages read: page 1. hit; page 2. push; page 3. kick; page 4. tease. Eventually we write “The End” on the inside of the back cover.

Writing lessons can be either guided, shared, or independent. I use picture making at the beginning of the year to get them used to making the books. Then I focus mainly on sentence and book making. I try to do writing lessons three days a week: Monday (guided), Wednesday (shared), and Friday (independent).

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